Progressive Patterns

Feelings of God

Bible

"When Jesus heard it, he marvelled, and said to them that followed, Truly I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel." (Matthew 8:10)

"But when he saw the multitudes, he was moved with compassion on them, because they fainted, and were scattered abroad, as sheep having no shepherd." (Matthew 9:36)

"And Jesus went forth, and saw a great multitude, and was moved with compassion toward them, and he healed their sick." (Matthew 14:14)

"Then Jesus called his disciples unto him, and said, I have compassion on the multitude, because they continue with me now three days, and have nothing to eat: and I will not send them away fasting, lest they faint in the way." (Matthew 15:32)

"Should not you also have had compassion on your fellowservant, even as I had pity on you?" (Matthew 18:33)

"So Jesus had compassion on them, and touched their eyes: and immediately their eyes received sight, and they followed him." (Matthew 20:34)

"Then says he unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful, even unto death: tarry you here, and watch with me." (Matthew 26:38)

"But Jesus held his peace." (Matthew 26:63)

 

"And he marvelled because of their unbelief." (Mark 6:6)

"And Jesus, when he came out, saw much people, and was moved with compassion toward them, because they were as sheep not having a shepherd: and he began to teach them many things." (Mark 6:34)

"And looking up to heaven, he sighed, and says unto him, Ephphatha, that is, Be opened." (Mark 7:34)

"I have compassion on the multitude, because they have now been with me three days, and have nothing to eat:" (Mark 8:2)

"And he sighed deeply in his spirit, and says, Why does this generation seek after a sign? truly I say unto you, There shall no sign be given unto this generation." (Mark 8:12)

"And he takes with him Peter and James and John, and began to be sore amazed, and to be very heavy; And says unto them, My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death: tarry you here, and watch." (Mark 14:33-34)

"But he held his peace, and answered nothing." (Mark 14:61)

 

"When Jesus heard these things, he marvelled at him, and turned him about, and said unto the people that followed him, I say unto you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel." (Luke 7:9)

"In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank you, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that you have hid these things from the wise and prudent, and have revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in your sight." (Luke 10:21)

"And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it," (19:41)

"And being in an agony he prayed more earnestly: and his sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground." (22:44)

 

"And his disciples remembered that it was written, The zeal of your house has eaten me up." (John 2:17)

"When Jesus therefore saw her weeping, and the Jews also weeping which came with her, he groaned in the spirit, and was troubled," (11:33)

"Jesus wept." (11:35)

"Jesus therefore again groaning in himself comes to the grave." (11:38)

"Now is my soul troubled; and what shall I say? Father, save me from this hour: but for this cause came I unto this hour." (12:27)

"When Jesus had thus said, he was troubled in spirit, and testified, and said, Truly, truly, I say unto you, that one of you shall betray me." (13:21)

"These things have I spoken unto you, that my joy might remain in you, and that your joy might be full." (15:11)

"And now come I to you; and these things I speak in the world, that they might have my joy fulfilled in themselves." (17:13)

 

"The Lord is not slack concerning his promise, as some men count slackness; but is longsuffering towards us, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance." (2 Peter 3:9)

"Fear not, little flock; for it is your Father's good pleasure to give you the kingdom." (Luke 12:32)

"Yet it pleased the LORD to bruise him; he has put him to grief: when you shall make his soul an offering for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall prolong his days, and the pleasure of the LORD shall prosper in his hand. He shall see of the travail of his soul, and shall be satisfied: by his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many; for he shall bear their iniquities." (Isaiah 53:10-11)

"The LORD your God in the midst of you is mighty; he will save, he will rejoice over you with joy; he will rest in his love, he will joy over you with singing." (Zephaniah 3:17)

"For as a young man marries a virgin, so shall your sons marry you and as the bridegroom rejoices over the bride, so shall your God rejoice over you." (Isaiah 62:5-17)

"Then I was by him, as one brought up with him: and I was daily his delight, rejoicing always before him." (Proverbs 8:30)

SOP

It was soul-anguish that wrenched from the lips of God's dear Son these mournful words: "Now is my soul troubled,--my soul is exceeding sorrowful even unto death." Christ's soul was bearing a weight of anguish because of the transgression of God's law. He was overwhelmed with horror and consternation at the fearful work sin had wrought. His burden of guilt was so great because of man's transgression of his Father's law, that human nature was inadequate to bear it. His inexpressible anguish forced from his pores large drops of blood, which fell upon the ground and moistened the sods of Gethsemane. {ST, August 14, 1879 par. 11}

Often had Jesus, with the twelve, resorted to Gethsemane for meditation and prayer, but never had he visited the spot with a heart so full of sorrow as upon the night of his betrayal. He had been earnestly conversing with his disciples; but as he neared the garden he became strangely silent. The disciples were perplexed, and anxiously regarded his countenance, hoping there to read an explanation of the change that had come over their Master. They had frequently seen him depressed, but never before so utterly sad and silent. As he proceeded, this strange sadness increased; yet they dared not question him as to the cause. His form swayed as if he was about to fall. The disciples looked anxiously for his usual place of retirement, that their Master might rest. {PrT, November 19, 1885 par. 6}

He went a short distance from his companions, not so far but that they could both see and hear him, and fell prostrate with his face upon the earth. He was overpowered by a terrible fear that God was removing his presence from him. He felt himself being separated from his Father by a gulf of sin, so broad, so black and deep, that his spirit shuddered before it. He clung convulsively to the cold, unfeeling ground, as if to prevent himself from being drawn still farther from God. The chilling dews of night fell upon his prostrate form, but the Redeemer heeded it not. From his pale lips wailed the bitter cry, "O my Father, if it be possible, let this cup pass from me; nevertheless not as I will, but as thou wilt." {PrT, November 19, 1885 par. 9}

In the heart of Christ, where reigned perfect harmony with God, there was perfect peace. He was never elated by applause, nor dejected by censure or disappointment. Amid the greatest opposition and the most cruel treatment, He was still of good courage. {DA 330.3}

When the disciples returned from their errand, they were surprised to find their Master speaking with the woman. He had not taken the refreshing draught that He desired, and He did not stop to eat the food His disciples had brought. When the woman had gone, the disciples entreated Him to eat. They saw Him silent, absorbed, as in rapt meditation. His face was beaming with light, and they feared to interrupt His communion with heaven. But they knew that He was faint and weary, and thought it their duty to remind Him of His physical necessities. Jesus recognized their loving interest, and He said, "I have meat to eat that ye know not of." {DA 190.4}

Those who think of the result of hastening or hindering the gospel think of it in relation to themselves and to the world. Few think of its relation to God. Few give thought to the suffering that sin has caused our Creator. All heaven suffered in Christ's agony; but that suffering did not begin or end with His manifestation in humanity. The cross is a revelation to our dull senses of the pain that, from its very inception, sin has brought to the heart of God. Every departure from the right, every deed of cruelty, every failure of humanity to reach His ideal, brings grief to Him. When there came upon Israel the calamities that were the sure result of separation from God,--subjugation by their enemies, cruelty, and death,--it is said that "His soul was grieved for the misery of Israel." "In all their affliction He was afflicted: . . . and He bare them, and carried them all the days of old." Judges 10:16; Isaiah 63:9. {Ed 263.1}

His Spirit "maketh intercession for us with groanings which cannot be uttered." As the "whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together" (Romans 8:26, 22), the heart of the infinite Father is pained in sympathy. Our world is a vast lazar house, a scene of misery that we dare not allow even our thoughts to dwell upon. Did we realize it as it is, the burden would be too terrible. Yet God feels it all. In order to destroy sin and its results He gave His best Beloved, and He has put it in our power, through co-operation with Him, to bring this scene of misery to an end. "This gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come." Matthew 24:14. {Ed 263.2}

When men and women have formed characters which God can endorse, when their self-denial and self-sacrifice have been fully made, when they are ready for the final test, ready to be introduced into God's family, what service will stand highest in the estimation of Him who gave Himself a willing offering to save a guilty race? What enterprise will be most dear to the heart of infinite love? What work will bring the greatest satisfaction and joy to the Father and the Son?--The salvation of perishing souls. Christ died to bring to men the saving power of the gospel. Those who cooperate with Him in carrying forward His great enterprise of mercy, laboring with all the strength God has given them to save those nigh and afar off, will share in the joy of the Redeemer when the redeemed host stand around the throne of God. {1SM 90.4}

This speck of a world was the scene of the incarnation and suffering of the Son of God. Christ did not go to worlds unfallen, but He came to this world, all seared and marred with the curse. The outlook was not favorable, but most discouraging. Yet "He shall not fail nor be discouraged, till He have set judgment in the earth." Isaiah 42:4. We must bear in mind the great joy manifested by the Shepherd at the recovery of the lost. He calls upon His neighbors: "Rejoice with Me; for I have found My sheep which was lost." And all heaven echoes the note of joy. The Father Himself joys over the rescued one with singing. What a holy ecstasy of joy is expressed in this parable! That joy it is your privilege to share. {6T 124.3}

Let the followers of Christ do all that is possible to teach repentance toward God and faith toward our Lord Jesus Christ. One soul gained brings joy to the Father and to the Son, and there is rejoicing in the presence of the angels of heaven, and an anthem of praise goes up from countless harps and voices through the heavenly courts. {ST, November 14, 1895 par. 5}

"As the bridegroom rejoiceth over the bride, so shall thy God rejoice over thee." Isaiah 62:5. "He will save, He will rejoice over thee with joy; He will rest in His love; He will joy over thee with singing." Zephaniah 3:17. And heaven and earth shall unite in the Father's song of rejoicing: "For this My son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost, and is found." {COL 207.1}

These only who, by prayer and watchfulness and love, work the works of Christ, can God rejoice over with singing. The more fully the Lord sees the character of His beloved Son revealed in His people, the greater is His satisfaction and delight in them. God Himself and the heavenly angels rejoice over them with singing. The believing sinner is pronounced innocent, while the guilt is placed on Christ. The righteousness of Christ is placed on the debtor's account, and against his name on the balance sheet is written: Pardoned. Eternal Life. . . . {ML 273.3}